Wednesday, June 09, 2010

shakertown smorgasbord

Foreword : I recognize this post is a little more lengthy than usual. I hope this will not deter you from reading, as within its text I attempt to connect the Shakers to Robert Stack, denture adhesives, barnyard appetites and home improvements. Quite the feat, if I do say so myself.

The first of the recent road trips led to the Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, Kentucky. This has long been one of my sister's favorite destinations and, having now experienced it for myself, I can understand its gravitational pull. If you're in need of a place to go, think, and be in peace...this is it. Quiet, simple, pristine, perfect: just the way the Shakers wanted it.
pleasanthill-4
While at Pleasant Hill we stayed in a little house dating back to the early 1800s. According to the many diaries found in the cottage, it is haunted by a ghost named Sister Polly. I'd like to pretend this didn't give me the jitters, but too many episodes of Unsolved Mysteries have left me a scaredy cat. I could almost hear Robert Stack's voiceover as I moved through the house.pleasanthill-1
Luckily, Polly did not make an appearance during our trip, though she did lead to a fun game my mom and I like to play where we name everyone we can think of with the same first name. It started out serious, but eventually led to Polly Pocket, Polly Graph, Polly Ester...and days later Polly Grip and Polly Eurathane. Do you know any Pollys?
[I've got some more to say about the struggle I had making this drawing in a future post...but no more mention of Polly, I promise.]

Among the things I loved the most about our time at Pleasant Hill was observing the many farm animals, especially the goats who attempted to snack on my sketchbook as I drew. I kid not...get it, kid not...
pleasanthill-2
If I had to name one thing that struck me the most about Kentucky as a whole, it was the beautiful green fields and the constrasting black barns. They are breathtaking. For quite a while now Edgar and I have contemplated painted our house, currently a timid pale gray, a more gutsy black. Seeing how beautiful these barns are on the landscape has given me the push to go for it!
pleasanthill-3
In retrospect, this was the most restful of trips: one I would highly recommend to anyone who needs an escape from the daily grind, cell phones, and, heaven forbid, blogs!

16 comments:

San said...

I know I repeat myself but I love your drawings. Especially the goat sketches are cool. Just a few lines and I know it's a goat feeding on gras. Amazing.

This trip sounds nice.

edgar cabrera said...

I really love this post! makes me wanna pack my bags and go and live with the goats!

Annie said...

I've been there, too, and I found it just as peaceful and beautiful as you did.

Polly Wanna Cracker?

Sandy aka Doris the Great said...

Polly anna!
Polly gone!

Kelley Bozarth said...

I grew up in Shaker Heights, OH and most of the original homes look a lot like these - including my parents'! We used to have "Shaker Day" every year when I was in school where we would take a huge field trip to some park, dress-up like Shakers (I remember my mom sewing costumes for us) and play games they used to play. One of those things that I think is specific to only my hometown :)

Diahn said...

Gorgeous! I love those black barns in Kentucky - I still remember seeing them for the first time, over 20 years ago, and thinking they were perfect, set among the rolling green hills.

suzanne cabrera said...

Thanks for reading...and the terrific Polly entries. Love it.

Barbara Campbell Thomas said...

I recall seeing some black houses up in Massachusetts--very, very old houses with wood siding. I thought they were STUNNING and ever since then me and my husband have talked about living in a black house--I know the pull. (Currently our home is pale gray blue--not as interesting....)

dinahmow said...

Polly Phonic?

As a kid, I loved creosoted(black) houses, especially if their window sashes were bright fire-engine red. Double-special if they had hollyhocks at the door!

TeresaR said...

KY is just a hop and a skip from us in southern IN! In fact, the landscape can be extremely similar. What gorgeous drawings of the Shaker buildings! Now I feel like we should get a goat just so I can sketch one. ;)

suzanne cabrera said...

Teresa---

I'm surprised you don't already have a goat!

cindy said...

i thoroughly enjoyed this post and can imagine you writing a book along the lines of sara midda and laura stoddart. i'd buy it in a heartbeat. enjoy your weekend!

suzanne cabrera said...

Thank you so much Cindy. You couldn't pay me a higher compliment! Truly.

Anonymous said...

polly mer

Polly vous francais?

polly graph
polly theistic

suzanne cabrera said...

Nice!!!!

Polly said...

: )
I love reading through your blog. I especially like this post! You're so talented and it was fun watching you create! I love your traveling moleskin with Gabi.
--- From your new friend Polly from Kentucky!